Physical properties of matter


    • - Properties that do not depend on the amount of the matter present.
      • Color- The visual perceptual property corresponding in humans.
      • Odor- Causedby one or more volatilized chemical compounds.
      • Luster - How shiny a substance is.
      • Malleability - The ability of a substance to be beaten into thin sheets.
      • Ductility - The ability of a substance to be drawn into thin wires.
      • Conductivity - The ability of a substance to allow the flow of energy or electricity.
      • Hardness - How easily a substance can be scratched.
      • Melting/Freezing Point - The temperature at which the solid and liquid phases of a substance are in equilibrium at atmospheric pressure.
      • Boiling Point - The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the pressure on the liquid (generally atmospheric pressure).
      • Density - The mass of a substance divided by its volume
      • Solubility- The capacity that some bodies have to dissolve in a liquid.
      • Elasticity- The capacity that some bodies have to deform when force is applied and recover the form when force is left to apply.
      • Tenacity- The capacity that oppose the bodies to break.
      • Fragility- The tendence that have the bodies to break or fracturate.
      • Temperarure- The grade of the speed the the atoms move in the bodies.


Extensive - Properties that do depend on the amount of matter present.
  • Mass - A measurement of the amount of matter in a object (grams).
  • Weight - A measurement of the gravitational force of attraction of the earth acting on an object.
  • Volume - A measurement of the amount of space a substance occupies.
  • Length- A measurement of 1 dimensional body.


Taken from: http://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/tutorialnotefiles/intext.htm


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Other properties of matter

Boiling point: The matter changes from liquid to gaseous in a given temperature.


Phases of Matter
Each phase of matter has its own chemical and physical properties. The phases of matter you need to know are:
  • Solid - a solid has a definite shape and volume
  • Liquid - a liquid has a definite volume, but can change shape


  • Gas - the shape and volume of a gas can change
Phase Changes
These phases of matter can change from one to another. Remember the definitions of the following phase changes:
    • Melting - melting occurs when a substance changes from a solid to a liquid
    • Boiling - boiling is when a substance changes from a liquid to a gas
    • Condensing - condensation is when a gas changes to a liquid
    • Freezing - freezing is when a liquid changes to a solid



Water is everywhere-even in the air!

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What are the following familiar objects? How can you describe them if you didn't know what they were?

People describe objects in many ways using size, shape, colors, and textures. Describing objects by using
  • size (place images here)
  • shape
  • color
  • texture
uses an object's properties. A property describes how an object looks, feels, or acts. The objects shown here have different kinds of properties:
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Name one property of the birthday present? Click inside the box first and type your answer



http://www.nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/textbook/whatismatter.html




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Characteristic Properties of Matter
Characteristic Properties of Matter


Big Bang
Big Bang

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Density
Density



**Big BangTheory**


**Density**


Temperature & Density
Temperature & Density


Using Characteristic Properties
Using Characteristic Properties


**Temperature& Density**
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**UsingCharacteristicProperties**



http://www.stcms.si.edu/pom/pom_student_pt1.htm









Properties of Matter----

Just as you use several adjectives to describe someone (color of hair or eyes, how tall or short, etc.) several properties, or characteristics, must be used in combination to adequately describe a kind of matter. Simply saying that something is a colorless liquid isn't enough to identify it as water. A lot of liquids are colorless, e.g. most alcohols and cyclohexane, as well as many solutions. More details are needed before one can zero in on the identity of a substance. Chemists will therefore, determine several properties, both chemical and physical, in order to characterize a particular sample of matter. The folowing chart shows the differences between the two kinds of properties, chemical and physical, as well as how the two kinds of physical properties, intensive and extensive, differ.






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Properties of Matter----

Just as you use several adjectives to describe someone (color of hair or eyes, how tall or short, etc.) several properties, or characteristics, must be used in combination to adequately describe a kind of matter. Simply saying that something is a colorless liquid isn't enough to identify it as water. A lot of liquids are colorless, e.g. most alcohols and cyclohexane, as well as many solutions. More details are needed before one can zero in on the identity of a substance. Chemists will therefore, determine several properties, both chemical and physical, in order to characterize a particular sample of matter. The folowing chart shows the differences between the two kinds of properties, chemical and physical, as well as how the two kinds of physical properties, intensive and extensive, differ.

Properties of Matter
Properties of Matter
www.matter.com











The Properties of Matter

The general properties of matter result from its relationship with mass and space. Because of its mass, all matter has inertia (the mass being the measure of its inertia) and weight, if it is in a gravitational field (see gravitation). Because it occupies space, all matter has volume and impenetrability, since two objects cannot occupy the same space simultaneously.
The special properties of matter, on the other hand, depend on internal structure and thus differ from one form of matter, i.e., one substance, to another. Such properties include ductility, elasticity, hardness, malleability, porosity (ability to permit another substance to flow through it), and tenacity (resistance to being pulled apart).www.matter.com











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Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter

An Investigation into the Property Changes of Materials

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Jul 6, 2008 **David R. Wetzel**
The only way to truly understand the properties of matter and changes which occur in the properties of matter is to conduct and inquiry-based investigation. external image rounded_corners_5_fff.png external image rounded_corners_5_fff.png external image rounded_corners_5_fff.png external image rounded_corners_5_fff.png
Children study about matter in physical science, along with the characteristic properties of matter called the physical and chemical. Each characteristic is typically investigated separately, leaving children wondering why they are always talked about in conjunction with each other.
However it is not difficult to study each characteristic in the same investigation using everyday household items. This investigation will study physical and chemical properties in one investigation, which is designed for grades 6 – 12.

Changes in Properties of Matter

Physical property changes of matter do not produce a new substance and are typically described by the following:
  • Color – every object has a color
  • Odor – intensity of smell
  • ensity – mass divided by volume
  • Luster – how shiny it is
  • Ductility – ability to be drawn into thin wires
  • Malleability – ability to be beaten into thin sheets
  • Elasticity – ability to return to original shape
  • Hardness – ability to be scratched
  • Conductivity – allows energy flow, electricity or heat
  • Insulator – resists flow of energy, electricity or heat
  • Organic/Inorganic – was once alive or is alive/was never alive
Chemical property changes of matter produces a new substance and can be typically described by the following:
  • Color – change in color indicates a chemical change
  • Temperature – change in temperature indicates a chemical change
phase 2 chart.JPG
phase 2 chart.JPG


taken from http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Analytical_Chemistry/Quantifying_Nature/Properties_of_Matter